The Dangers Of Pest Control

Bird control and other forms of pest control are a necessary evil in terms of environmental awareness. Most industrial and commercial buildings require some form of it, with almost all airports and airport hangars literally placing their lives in the hands of effective bird control companies. Aviation firms have claimed many losses in assets – both mechanical and human, due to the presence of pest birds.
While many forms of bird pest control devices are available for use in these ventures, some companies and individual tend to take a darker route. The use of lethal avicides is becoming an increasingly alarming problem as sometimes it affects not only the animal group targeted by the desired system, but also other species found in the area. Avicides, like the avicide Avitrol, causes intense suffering, not only to birds but also to other animals in the surrounding ecosystem. Avitrol causes disorientation, violent convulsions and erratic behaviour for hours before an eventual death.

It causes secondary death by having untargeted animals, foxes, hawks (and other birds of prey), cats and even dogs, to be poisoned by eating birds killed by it. Many other species also succumb to the secondary effects of this form of pest control, even though use of it has been restricted and sometimes prohibited in certain areas. Unscrupulous pest control companies use it, despite the outcry and restriction, as Avitrol because, even though it has harsh implications not only for targeted birds but also the ecosystem they inhabit, it remains visibly effective to clients. There are many chemical substitutes for Avitrol, as well as many other pest control devices, that offer a non-lethal alternative.
These include:
• Netting,
• Electrified and non-electrified wiring,
• Barriers,
• Turf chemical sprays,
• Frightening devices – sonic and visual, and
• Barbed porcupine wire.
Another disturbing factor is the dishonesty by these pest control companies to their clients, many of them claim that Avitrol is a flock-dispersing agent that simply scares off birds, or mildly incapacitates them. The reality of Avitrol and its effects is much more grim.
With interest groups like PETA having called for awareness needing to be created around proper, humane pest control devices and the more lethal alternatives – legal and otherwise – becoming general practice. This is causing the pest control industry, and more specifically the Bird control industry, to come under scrutiny.
This in itself is a huge problem, as it creates a distrust of companies and devices. With so many variations available to companies and clients it becomes a case of an industry regulating itself – with each company regulating the behaviour of its employees.